ABS: New Guidance on Energy Storage

ABS has published The ABS Guide for Use of Supercapacitors in the Marine and Offshore Industries (Supercapacitor Guide) to support safe application of hybrid power in the marine and offshore industries.  
The maritime industry is increasingly interested in using supercapacitors as an energy storage solution when quick energy delivery is required during a peak loading condition. Particularly, offshore supply vessel (OSV) owners are considering supercapacitors to supplement energy supply during high-load operations, such as using power thrusters for dynamic positioning while station keeping. 
"We are developing a series of guides on energy storage systems so our clients have as many options as possible to effectively manage energy use,” said ABS Senior Vice President of Engineering and Technology, Derek Novak. “Supercapacitors have a high power density and a fast charging and discharging process to augment other power sources – which can greatly improve the efficiency of traditional energy sources.” 
The Supercapacitor Guide delineates types of supercapacitors, including electrochemical capacitors and lithium ion capacitors, and defines requirements for design, construction and installation of supercapacitors in marine and offshore applications. 
“As a leading class organization, we provide our clients and industry with reliable guidance to enable technology development that affords safer and more efficient operations,” said ABS Chairman, President and CEO, Christopher J. Wiernicki. “We focus on staying ahead of the curve so industry can leverage alternative energy sources to reduce costs and improve productivity.” 
The guide, available for download from the ABS website, is the second in a series on hybrid electric power systems following the ABS Guide for Use of Lithium Batteries in the Marine in Offshore Industries. ABS also issued the ABS Advisory on Hybrid Electric Power Systems, which takes a measured approach to evaluating potential advantages and disadvantages, challenges and level of readiness for the primary hybrid electric power systems and components most suited for marine and offshore applications.  

EUROPE: CATERPILLAR MARINE TECHNOLOGY ORDERED FOR HYBRID TUG


The Cat Marine Advanced Variable Drive is to be installed on a tugboat to be built by Turkey’s Sanmar Shipyard.
Announcing the contract, Caterpillar Marine said that its AVD will offer improvements in fuel efficiency and vessel performance by means of a fully-integrated hydro-mechanical propulsion system.
‘Different from a typical Power Take In (PTI) solution, the AVD incorporates a planetary gear set allowing seamless clutch engagement of main engines, auxiliary engines, or both to provide a scalable power installation to meet any customer need in terms of maximum vessel speed, power, or bollard pull,’ explained Nathan Kelly, product definition engineer for Caterpillar Marine. 
‘This also allows propeller speed independent of engine speed so optimal engine efficiency can be achieved leading to fuel savings of 15%-20%.’
The Sanmar hydraulic hybrid tug will be a Robert Allan Ltd-designed RAmparts 2400SX harbor tug incorporating an integrated Caterpillar AVD system of 3512 main engines, a C32 auxiliary engine, Cat MTA 627 fixed pitch tug thrusters, and bridge controls.  
Compared to a conventional tug with equivalent bollard pull, the return on investment is estimated at three years or less, based on projected fuel and operating cost savings.
Ali Gurun, director of projects, Sanmar Shipyards, commented on the new vessel initiative: ‘This strategic development between Sanmar and Caterpillar will provide a highly optimised, lower cost alternative to conventional electric hybrid systems with similar benefits regarding improved performance, lower noise and lower emissions.’

Marine battery market is charging up rapidly

Hybrid propulsion with batteries is changing marine propulsion for the better, and not just in the OSV sector.

Earlier this month I noted that although the market for offshore support vessels remains depressed for the time being, when it recovers, all newbuilds will have batteries. Well, maybe not absolutely all of them, but a good number of those built for more sophisticated markets.

Battery suppliers such as Plan B Energy Storage predict that most new vessels will have a battery room, with options for energy storage either integrated at the newbuild stage or added later. If not a battery room as such they may well have a containerised/modular battery pack.

As I noted here,  recent months have seen further important developments in battery-based hybrid energy systems for OSVs, including a platform supply vessel in which a hybrid power system replaced a generator.

Norway’s NOx funds wants to help owners refitting vessels that are on long-term contracts with hybrid energy solutions based on batteries. It has set a deadline for of 30 June 2018 for owners who want to apply for support for PSVs engaged on term charters.

This week also saw global aluminium supplier Hydro make a significant investment in Corvus Energy, which has number of contracts for batteries for OSVs. Hydro sees energy storage and battery solutions as an increasingly important part of the future of energy systems as whole. It’s right to do so. Batteries are being fitted on all kinds of vessels, from tugs to ferries to research ships. FinFerries and Siemens talk about the hybrid ferry Elektra here.

For the time being, the batteries in hybrid energy solutions for ships are being supplied by OEMs, but given the way demand is growing I’m sure it can’t be long before one of the battery companies is snapped up by a major marine industry player.

via OSJ

Norsk Hydro invests in Corvus Energy

photo credit: Corvus Energy

Richmond, BC based Corvus Energy is jointly held by management, BW Group, Statoil Technology Invest, investors affiliated with El Cuervo Holdings Limited Partnership, Canadian and US family offices and private investors.
Corvus Energy provides high power energy storage in the form of modular lithium ion battery systems. Its purpose-built, field-proven battery systems provide sustained power to hybrid and all-electric heavy industrial equipment, including large marine propulsion drives.
“Corvus is extremely pleased to have Hydro join our ownership team,” said Willie Wagen, Global VP of Sales & Marketing. Adding, “The experience and financial support of Hydro will enable Corvus to scale our operations and accelerate our market penetration even further.”
Established in 1905, Hydro is one of the world’s largest fully integrated aluminum companies, with over 35,000 employees, and operations in 40 countries on all continents.
Hydro was attracted to Corvus not only for the commercial viability of the technology as the adoption of battery power for all-electric and hybrid marine applications increases, but also in consideration of their own future power needs. Based in Norway and rooted in more than a century of experience in renewable energy, technology and innovation, Hydro is committed to strengthening the viability of its customers and communities, shaping a sustainable future through innovative aluminum solutions.
“We see that energy storage and battery solutions are an increasingly important part of the future of energy systems, and as a significant energy player-both as a power producer and consumer of energy-we want Hydro to be developing this industry further,” said Executive Vice President for energy and business development at Hydro, Arvid Moss.