Damen delivers hybrid ASD tug

FEBRUARY 27, 2015 — Netherlands-based towage and salvage specialist Multraship recently took delivery of a Damen ASD 2810 Hybrid tug built at Damen Shipyards Galaţi, in Romania, as part of a fleet expansion program that includes a number of orders for Damen vessels.
The ASD 2810 Hybrid, with an expected bollard pull of 61 tonnes, is a new design and the vessel just delivered to Multraship is the second of its class to be built.
"This hybrid tug is a unique concept," says Dinu Berariu, Project Manager at Damen Shipyards Galaţi. "It features a diesel-direct, diesel-electric and battery powered propulsion system. This hybrid configuration will enable Multraship to lower fuel costs by up to 30 percent and emissions by up to 60 percent."
After on-time and on-budget completion, the vessel, named Multratug 28, sailed under her own keel to the Netherlands from Galaţi.
Headquartered in the harbor city of Terneuzen, Multraship operates in the ports around the Scheldt estuary, in Zeeland seaports and the Belgian ports of Ghent and Antwerp, as well as the Bulgarian port of Burgas on the Black Sea.
Multraship's fleet expansion program stems from its increasing customer base in the offshore sectors as well as growing demand for harbor towage services.
In addition to the ASD 2810 Hybrid, which is a good fit for both these areas of operation, the company has ordered two Damen ASD 3212 vessels, that are currently being built at Damen Song Cam shipyard in Vietnam and will be delivered before the end of the second quarter of this year.

Corvus Energy bags Energy Storage System order for 2 battery hybrid LNG ferries




Corvus Energy, Elkon Electric and Seaspan Ferries have received an energy storage system (ESS) contract from the Turkish shipyard Sedef Shipbuilding.
The contract is for supplying two battery hybrid LNG ferries to be built at the shipyard, designed by VARD Marine.
The new vessels will use a 1050V DC, 546 kWh Energy Storage System (ESS) consisting of 84 Corvus Energy AT 6500 advanced lithium polymer batteries.
Construction is scheduled to start in early 2015. The ESS will be integrated with an Elkon Electrical propulsion and distribution system also.
In addition, they will be powered with dual-fuel engines working on diesel and liquefied natural gas (LNG) with a Corvus ESS as spinning reserve and power for responsive harbor manoeuvring.
The 148.9 meter ferries which can accommodate up to 59 trailers will be operational by late 2016.
Most of the time, the vessels will operate a drop trailer-only route between Vancouver and Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada.
The innovative hybrid propulsion system with a Corvus ESS will help reduce fossil fuel emissions, improving operational efficiency.
Corvus Energy has so far deployed over 20 MWh of ESS in various ferries including the largest hybrid vessel systems in the world.
Besides,the company always ensures that this battery hybrid propulsion system performs well at startup, and far into the future.
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Corvus Energy, Elkon Electric (an Imtech Marine company) and Seaspan Ferries Corporation announced the award of the energy storage system (ESS) contract for two battery hybrid LNG ferries to be built at the Turkish shipyard Sedef Shipbuilding Inc., and designed by VARD Marine Inc.The new vessels will each use a 1050VDC, 546kWh Energy Storage System (ESS) consisting of 84 Corvus Energy AT6500 advanced lithium polymer batteries. 

The ESS will be integrated with an Elkon Electrical propulsion and distribution system and will be powered with dual-fuel engines capable of running on diesel and liquefied natural gas (LNG) with a Corvus ESS as spinning reserve and power for responsive harbour manoeuvring. 

The 148.9 metre ferries, both expected to be in operation by late 2016, will accommodate up to 59 trailers. Construction is scheduled to start in early 2015. The vessels will operate a drop trailer-only route between Vancouver and Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. 

The innovative hybrid propulsion system with a Corvus ESS will help reduce fossil fuel emissions and greatly improve operational efficiency. 

"We are very pleased that Corvus' energy storage system was selected for these innovative vessels." Said Andrew Morden, President and CEO, Corvus Energy. "The two new Seaspan ferries are examples of the significant benefits both operationally and environmentally of battery hybrid LNG propulsion and it is encouraging to see this technology take root in Canada." 

Corvus' lithium polymer energy storage technology is an effective solution for hybridization of commercial vessels with dynamic duty cycles, providing consistent reliable power to support greatly improved efficiency when compared to conventional propulsion systems. 

With over 20 MWh of ESS deployed including the largest hybrid vessel systems in the world, Corvus Energy has the breadth of experience and expert personnel to ensure this battery hybrid propulsion system performs well at start-up, and far into the future. 

About Corvus Energy 
Corvus Energy provides high power energy storage in the form of modular lithium Ion battery systems. Its purpose built, field proven battery systems provide sustained power to hybrid and fully electric heavy industrial equipment including large marine propulsion drives. 
For more information please visit www.corvus-energy.com

via altenergymag + greentechlead

Voith Schneider Propellers for Third CMAL Hybrid Ferry



Scottish-owned Caledonian Maritime Assets Ltd (CMAL) has chosen Voith propulsion systems for its new hybrid ferry. Like its sister vessels, MV Hallaig and MV Lochinvar, the new hybrid ferry will be built by Ferguson Shipbuilders in Glasgow. CMAL relies on two VSP 16R5 EC/90-1 as well as two bow-tooth couplings and the Voith electronic control system.
 
The new ferry will use the same electronic control system already installed on the MV Hallaig. The control system consists of a modular hardware and software architecture and offers many control features and standardized interfaces, making it possible to actuate the two 375kW VSPs.
 
As is the case with the other two ferries in CMAL’s hybrid fleet, the new ferry combines a diesel-electric propulsion system with lithium ion batteries. To reduce the load on the diesel engine, the ferry’s two lithium batteries are charged overnight via a land cable. On the sister vessels, CMAL has already achieved savings of 38%.
 
The ferry will operate in Scottish waters characterized by strong currents. Many Scottish landings consist of concrete ramps where the vessels dock without being firmly moored. Accurate control and positioning as well as maximum maneuverability are imperative to guarantee safe operations when docking in rough seas, Voith said. To ensure that the two VSPs are protected when docking, they are arranged diagonally in recesses and not in a central position at the bow and in the stern as is normally the case.
 
The vessel is expected to enter into service in spring 2016. It measures 43.5 meters in length and 12.2 meters in breadth and is capable of accommodating approximately 150 passengers and 23 cars. The service speed of the hybrid ferry is nine knots.

Diesel Hybrid Luxury Yacht? Meet the Savannah



Hybrid cars are not a new thing anymore and the technology is currently spreading to aircraft. But how about boats? Worry not as someone already made one. It’s called the Savannah, has a minimalistic design, unique features and a hybrid diesel-electric powertrain.

The Dutch company that made it, Feadship, says it’s the first fully functional hybrid luxury boat in the world. Around 1,000 people worked for 4 years to create and build the Savannah and we have to say they have done an awesome job.

It might look simple from the outside, but the multi-million dollar barge comes with exquisite features like an underwater viewing lounge so you can gaze upon the sea life, an open-aft design that allows multiple activities out in the sun, a 29-foot (8.8 meters) deck-level pool, garage, 4 guest rooms, a VIP suite with balcony and even a cinema.

When satan’s fuel meets the heavenly electricity

The Savannah can basically work like your Toyota Prius, the only difference being the huge diesel engine and the oversized components. The hull packs a huge Lithium-ion battery pack fed by three generators that are coupled to the combustion engine.

The diesel engine is a Wartsila 9L20 four-stroke diesel that cranks no less than 1,800 kW (2,413 hp). This is attached to a Caterpillar C32 and two Caterpillar C18 generators.

This allows for three drive modes - electric, diesel and hybrid. Compared to another vessel in its class, the Savannah scores a 30 percent better fuel economy, thanks to the hybrid powertrain, a special designed aft, bigger propeller and a very slim hull.

Why would you care about fuel consumption if you afford a boat as opulent as this one? Guess it’s not about that, but more about making a statement and encouraging the adoption of hybrid systems to cut down emissions. Or it’s just a very new and uber-expensive toy for the 1% that can buy it.


FortisBC to supply BC Ferries with 300k gigajoules of LNG for hybrid vessels


FortisBC has finalized an agreement with BC Ferries to provide three new vessels with liquefied natural gas over the next 10 years.
The utilities provider announced February 2 it would supply 300,000 gigajoules of LNG — or the energy equivalent of 7.8 million litres of diesel fuel — to the ferry service beginning next year.
It would take three Olympic-sized swimming pools to hold 7.5 million litres of water.
The first of the three new ships is expected to enter service in August 2016, replacing the outgoing Queen of Burnaby and Queen of Nanaimo.
The Queen of Burnaby serves the Comox-Powell River route, while Queen of Nanaimo serves the Tsawwassen-Gulf Islands route.
The third vessel is expected to be delivered by February 2017 and will help service along the Tsawwassen-Gulf Islands route.
All three are being built in Poland and have dual-fuel capability, allowing them to run on both LNG and diesel.
The entire project is slated to cost $252 million, which includes $51 million allocated to cover taxes and federal import duties.
FortisBC is providing $6 million in incentive funding for the project — about 2.3% of the total cost.
The LNG will come from an expanded Tilbury facility in Delta and the Mt. Hayes facility on Vancouver Island.
BC Ferries told Business In Vancouver last July that it spent $126 million on diesel fuel in 2013, but internal number-crunching indicates it could cuts those costs in half by relying on LNG.
Source: BIV